Category Archives: A Daily Dose

Just a story that needed telling.

Peep-peep-peeping

Never considered myself much of a peeping-tom, but lets face it sometimes you just can’t deny that insatiable curiosity unless you just go ahead and look. The hardest time for me to not look into the lives of those around me is when it’s evening time and I’m out walking the neighborhood. You see the glowing light cast on the pavement, see a form cross the light’s path, and wonder “Huh, wonder what/who caused that?” Your head turns almost on its own accord and before you know you’re watching someone set the table for dinner or changing the channel on the TV.

Tonight, I was walking upstairs to my room and had one such peeping-tom experience. To the limited few who have seen my new home in New England, I was on our second floor heading to our third but it’s not an all important detail for those of you who haven’t. We do not have curtains- none of us here like them in the first place. This detail gives us unhampered natural lighting, but also allows for unhampered viewing in both directions (inside and outside).

I was walking to the next staircase and happen to see light from across the way to the next door neighbors. There I spied chaotic movement. Naturally, I stopped and thought “What in the world???” Care to take a stab at what I saw?

Hooked I see. ūüôā Don’t worry, we all have that curiosity.

Anyway to continue, one of the the neighbors is repeatedly jumping up and down. My suspicion is that this woman is playing one of those Dance Revolution Games where you have a pad of the floor and have to jump on the proper square in order to score points. Watching the neighbor was entertaining as hell for a little while because I couldn’t actually see what she was doing other than jump-jump-jumping. And she was pretty involved in her jump-jump-jumping. The picture is of Jim Carey in¬†Yes Man¬†playing one such game.

I’m guilty of having one of these games for my Wii. It’s dangerous when I play because I’m not very coordinated. I’m sure that doesn’t come to much of a surprise to many of you. Graceful¬†one thing “I ain’t!”

P.S. She’s still at it an hour later.

Bridges to Cross

So, there are the literal bridges that people ford across to get from one coastal plain to another. And then their are the figurative ones.

As a child, I was obsessed with crossing over bridges. I have been raised on the tales of¬†“wailing my head off in the backseat”¬†because I wanted to go over the bridge not under.¬†My indulging mother would plan her car trips around attempting to accommodate the screaming toddler in the backseat to avoid such outbursts. Not an easy task I am sure, but that’s what she did. What can I say, but that a mother’s love for her child is strong….and my mother probably wanted to save her ears from an unwanted assault.

As I grew, my love for bridges changed: as did I. They were no longer just a way to travel, but a way to leave something behind. With each move, each bridge seemed like a way to leave some undesired episode or person. Not saying that there were many of these circumstances that I wanted to forget, but we were thankfully instructed by this wonderful, loving mother to look to each move as a new adventure. Use it, if you will, as a way to reinvent ourselves from something we didn’t want to be to something or someone we did want to be. It was this great concept that has probably lead to more moves in my life than have been strictly necessary, but I am getting ahead of myself. That will be a topic for another night.

I now look at bridges as structural elements- some breathtakingly beautiful and artistic and others lacking in imagination, but all serving a function.

I, unfortunately, cannot take credit for these pictures as they are in parts of the world I have yet to visit. This beautiful bridge pictured above is the Helix at Raffles Avenue and Bayfront Bridge in Singapore (follow the links for more information).

These stunning structures are works of art carefully created by architects and structural engineers giving mankind not only functional pieces, but attractive designed elements. I could spend a good amount of time on architectural structures as it is a passion of mine, but this post really isn’t about the literal kind of bridge.

In the beginning, I alluded to figurative bridges. It is this type of bridge that is really what started this post. We all reach a time- bridge- that requires a decision to be made. It is these decisions that mold us into the people we are. Maybe life can and should be looked at like a bridge. We are born standing on one coast and it’s each decision however small or great that allow us to advance toward the other side. What awaits us on the other side is death. Now wait, before you get to thinking “how morbid!” Death is a fact we must all eventually face. But it’s our decisions that determine the length, elegance, slope, and artistic style of our bridge- or life. Or you could look at life like a series of bridges. Major milestones would be represented by a new bridge. Marriage, parenthood, new careers, drastic¬†re-locations- of course there are also bridges of morality. We each just have to choose which we are willing to cross. The older we become the more these bridges mean- some more to others than to ourselves other lesser to others than ourselves.

What really has me pondering is how these blasted bridges- crossed or uncrossed- change forevermore relationships we’ve painstakingly nurtured¬†and developed. A journey ends (death), a bridge (marriage, parenthood, move, etc.) is crossed and these bridges or ties to others that made us feel stronger or feel more whole start to collapse. Once crossed it’s as if the bridge can never be uncrossed. It was only strong enough to allow one trip across. We are only able to look back either with longing or relief.

While I was in my last years of high school or early years of college my mother, the wise sage that she is, gave me a card. It changed how I look at each event in my life. I don’t remember the exact words, but the message was something to the extent of “Life is like a car with only one gear: Forward.”